How to Cut Logs into Slices

Do you need to know how to cut logs into slices? It is a common question. Cutting logs into slices can be a daunting task. It is difficult to determine the right size of each slice and how many times you should cut it through.

Felling trees for firewood is an important chore that every homeowner should know how to do. Not only can this save money, but it also keeps logs from being wasted if they are not used for firewood in time. With chainsaws available at most hardware stores, cutting logs into slices has never been easier!

This blog post will teach you some of the most efficient ways to accomplish this task with ease.

Best Way to Cut Logs into Slices

Chainsaws are the most popular type of chainsaw because they are more versatile than other types of saws. A chainsaw can cut through a log up to 12 inches in diameter and make it much easier to split wood with an axe or maul.

They can be used to cut logs into slices, trim branches off trees and limbs off fallen trees or even uproot a tree.

Method 1 – Freestyling it

Wood slicing can be a tedious process, but with the chainsaw and support, it will take an hour or less. You’ll need to make sure your log is in place before you start cutting because this method of wood-slicing requires no extra equipment!

You don’t want to have any part of the tree overhanging anything that might become damaged if exposed by pulling away from its surface; so use caution when chopping off pieces near structures like outhouses, birdhouses, fences etc

You have to be careful when operating a chainsaw, no matter how experienced or expert you may be. So it’s important that you always take the necessary precautions to protect yourself from injury.

Before cutting your log into slices, it is important that you take some safety measures.

Important Safety Measures

Before cutting your log into slices it is important that you take some safety measures. Wear protective gloves and boots in order to avoid getting cut by the sharp blades on your saw–they’re less likely to run into any other dangers when they’re fully dressed!

Cover up with long sleeves, jeans or chaps lined in chain-mail (to protect from those pesky flying sparks!)

Alongside hearing protection for all ears involved, sunglasses are key so as not to get blinded while cutting through logs. Safety goggles will also help keep debris out of your eyes should anything be thrown about during this potentially hazardous task: it’s important that every part of the body is covered before turning your attention to your log slices!

 

Step 1 – Prop the Log

When cutting wood, you never want to cut the slices with a tree log on the ground. That position makes it more difficult to control your cuts and if your chainsaw chain hits the dirt, then that can dull its blade instantly!

If you happen to hit dirt while using a chainsaw, your chainsaw will be prone to be dulled by tiny pieces of particles from soil or sand getting lodged between the chain teeth on either side. The fragments will cause more friction and damage over time by limiting the sharpness of the blades.

 

 

You never want to cut wood slices with a fallen tree log directly below because that forces you into an awkward stance were controlling those cuts becomes much more difficult.

For the best and most even cuts for your logs, you’ll want to prop your log using a chainsaw horse.

Step 2: Identify the Tree Knots

Tree knots can be difficult obstacles to cut through using your chainsaw, very often they are much harder wood than the surrounding material. Not only does this make for a more challenging and dangerous task but it also puts an unnecessary strain on your chainsaw which may lead to damage or breakage.

To reduce the chance of injury, always be mindful of where any tree knots are and avoid them when cutting your log into slices.

Tree knots are circular areas where the wood is very condensed. You should be looking for both circle shapes that don’t run along with the bark and those which protrude from the trunk.

Step 3: Measure your Tree Log and Mark the sections to be Cut

The thickness of the wood slices is up to you when cutting with a chainsaw. 2-inch slices, 5-inch slices or 10-inch slices are all options that you can cut your log into.

Cutting the wood is a straightforward process, but it’s important to measure and mark your logs first. This will ensure that each cut you make has even edges and lengths for more precise cuts.

Step 4: Begin Cutting

To use your saw correctly though you’ll need two hands and plenty of upper body strength as well as patience because this job can be quite tedious.

First, turn on your chainsaw and make sure that you have both hands firmly wrapped around it. With the chainsaw at about 4 inches off of the ground, squeeze the throttle as hard as possible while moving in quick downward motions towards where you want to start cutting.

 

How to Cut Logs into Slices

 

You may be tempted to push down hard on the blade, but this can cause a dull chain. If you find that your chainsaw is having trouble cutting through wood as it should or there are small pieces of sawdust coming out with every cut then it’s time for new blades!

When you’re cutting through wood, make sure to keep an eye on the line you made to mark it and cut as closely along it as possible.

Step 5: Rinse and Repeat

Firmly grip the chainsaw and use a bit of force to cut through the trunk. Take care not to hit yourself or any other person in close proximity when you do this, as it can be quite dangerous!

Once you’ve finished cutting off one slice from an end of the log, make sure that no part remains on top.

Then repeat the process.

 

Method 2 – Use a Jig

Log slicing has been a difficult skill to master.

Sometimes you end up with slices that are thinner or thicker than the rest, which can change how they cook in the oven and create all sorts of problems for your recipe. That’s why many people turn to chainsaws when it comes time to cut a log down into slices – but cutting each slice evenly is still tough without some sort of guide system like this handy jig!

A simple wood slicing jig is so easy to make, all you need are a few 2 x 4’s and some nails. This will serve as a guide to help your chainsaw blade stay on track as it cuts through the tree with ease.

Follow these steps below when starting:

 Step 1: Build your Jig

You should measure the diameter of your tree log to make sure it’s cut appropriately. Once you have that measurement, transfer it onto a 2 x 4 and then cut two pieces of equal lengths with a saw.

The tree log will need to be placed into a box-like enclosure made of 2 x 4 wood. This should not be difficult, as the pieces are already cut for this purpose and all you have to do is assemble them together by nailing one piece on top of another.

You’ll do this until it forms an enclosure that is at least four inches longer than the initial measurement.

After you have the two boards nailed together on one end, slide them along to find out where they need to be attached. You will now have a U shape and can nail in another board (one that is shorter) into the longer 2 x 4 piece.

The longer piece gets nailed against each side where they meet in an angle shape with both boards meeting together lengthwise; then find out how far down from there you need to nail after sliding along (or feeling) the trunk’s bark.

Nails are what hold these pieces together tightly so don’t skimp!

With the final nail placed, you now have a 2 x 4 box.

 

 Step 1 - Prop the Log When cutting wood, you never want to cut the slices with a tree log on the ground. That position makes it more difficult to control your cuts and if your chainsaw chain hits the dirt, then that can dull its blade instantly! If you happen to hit dirt while using a chainsaw, your chainsaw will be prone to be dulled by tiny pieces of particles from soil or sand getting lodged between the chain teeth on either side. The fragments will cause more friction and damage over time by limiting the sharpness of the blades.

 

Step 2: Place your Jig on the Tree Log

In order to ensure the right thickness for your desired cut, slide the jig down over the top of the log and adjust until it is at a suitable height.

Put on your safety goggles and ear protection before you start. Slide the jig down an inch to accommodate for a raised chainsaw blade level, hold it in place with screws through two opposite sides of the jig so that it won’t move while cutting.

Step 3: Begin Cutting

Make sure that you’re holding the chainsaw firmly in both hands. Squeeze the throttle and slowly move it across, starting on one side of your jig piece to make a cut level with where you want to be when cutting all four sides for each slot. If this doesn’t work well at first due to poor hand placement or blade alignment then just take time practising before continuing!

The best chainsaw users use light pressure and let the power of their tool do most of the work. If you’re pushing hard on your blade, then it’s time to sharpen it before continuing with that cut!

With expert skill, you can stack the cut slices neatly. To start cutting more log slices, repeat the process of chopping down a tree and slicing it into pieces.

Final Thoughts

If you want clean, even cuts in your log slices for all sorts of creative projects then follow the steps outlined on this page.

As a reminder, if you are cutting thicker tree logs, then it is best to use 16 inch or 18-inch chainsaw blades that will make quick work out of any job.